Philosophy Party: October 25th!

Happy midterms everyone! Hopefully, things aren’t too stressful, but luckily the Philosophy Department has the perfect way to unwind!

On Friday, October 25th, the Philosophy Department will be hosting an event for all philosophy majors, minors, or any students interested in philosophy — come by for an afternoon of games and free food! It will be hosted from 3:30p.m. to 5:00p.m. in the University Club on 1302 N. Alder Street.

Hope to see you there!

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Philosopher Kate Manne to Deliver 2019 Brown and Haley Lectures

Originated in 1953, Brown and Haley became the first fully endowed lectureship in the history of the University of Puget Sound in 1981. The lectures are intended to make significant contributions to the understanding of urgent problems confronting society, emphasizing perspectives in the social sciences or humanities. During their two-day residency, the invited speaker not only delivers two public lectures, but also visits two classes and interacts with faculty and students outside of the classroom. In recent years, the committee has especially focused on bringing in emerging scholars whose work transcends disciplinary boundaries.

For 2019, we are very pleased to have philosopher Kate Manne, Associate Professor of Philosophy at Cornell University, as the Brown and Haley lecturer. Manne will give two free public talks on September 18 and 19, at 7pm, in the Tahoma Room in Thomas Hall. Her first talk is titled “What is Misogyny? Concepts, Targets, and Triggers”, and her second talk is titled “Unassuming: On Epistemic Entitlement, Mansplaining, and Gaslighting”.

Manne’s work on misogyny has received international recognition. Her first book, Down Girl: The Logic of Misogyny, was chosen as one of the “books of the year” by Times Higher Education, Washington Post, and The Big Issue; and it recently won the 2019 PROSE Award for Excellence in Humanities. In addition to her academic work, she has published political and cultural commentary in The New York Times, Newsweek, Times Literary Supplement, and more. For her scholarship and influence, Dr. Manne has been recently recognized as one of Prospect Magazine’s Top 50 World Thinkers.

Join the GQS & Philosophy Summer Book Club

This summer, the Gender & Queer Studies and Philosophy Book Club will be meeting to discuss Prof. Kate Manne’s work Down Girl. These meetings are open to all and lunch will be provided at every meeting. Contact nkranzdorf@pugetsound.edu for more information.

Kate Manne is an assistant professor of the Sage School of Philosophy at Cornell University. She will be guest lecturing from September 18-19, 2019 as part of the Brown and Haley lecture series.

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2019 Puget Sound Undergraduate Philosophy Conference Report

From January 31–February 1, 2019, students from the Philosophy Department led the 2019 Puget Sound Undergraduate Philosophy Conference featuring student presenters from around the country. Here are some photos from the event:

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The conference was covered by The Trail, and all accepted papers and corresponding comments are now published in Sound Ideas

2019 Puget Sound Undergraduate Philosophy Conference Featured in The Trail

Recently, students from the Philosophy Department led the 2019 Puget Sound Undergraduate Philosophy Conference featuring student presenters from around the country. The Puget Sound student newspaper, The Trail, covered the event with interviews from UPS students, visiting student presenters, and the keynote speaker Professor Manuel Vargas (University of California, San Diego). To read the article, visit this link.

The author of the article, Juliano Estrada Donatelli, writes: 

The conference was inclusive and pushed students both within and outside the philosophy department to think and engage with other points of view.

“I love the idea that people are coming from all over and are sharing their ideas and allowing us to engage in those critical conversations,” Hanson said, highlighting the value of this student-led conference.

By allowing students to organize events and both conduct research and share these topics amongst their peers, this conference offered a really unique opportunity for students to delve into the multidisciplinary and hands-on experience of a liberal arts education.

 

Rise Up: The Hamilton Tribute Band

On Thursday, February 7th at 7:30 pm, Rise Up: The Hamilton Tribute Band will be performing in Schneebeck Concert Hall. Tickets are required. The Puget Sound events page describes the event:

Rise Up is an ensemble of top Seattle vocalists and musicians that performs the amazing music of HamiltonHamilton is a record-breaking Broadway musical and winner of 11 Tonys, including Best Musical. It is a sweeping national cultural phenomenon with music that marries hip hop, R&B, and Broadway. Rise Up delivers a performance that captures all the sophistication, detail, and emotion of the music of Hamilton. It has performed extensively in the Northwest, delighting theater, festival, and club audiences and frequently selling out.

Thursday, February 7, 2019
7:30 pm
Schneebeck Concert Hall

Tickets required.

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Puget Sound Undergraduate Philosophy Conference: January 31–February 1

The fifth Puget Sound Undergraduate Philosophy Conference, run entirely by students, will be from January 31–February 1, 2019. This conference features presentations from undergraduate philosophy scholars from various schools across the country with additional commentary from Puget Sound students.

All presentations, with the exception of the keynote address, are delivered by undergraduate students. For more information about presentation topics, the keynote speaker, and how philosophy students are involved, visit the conference press release.

This conference is free and open to the public. For the conference program with a complete schedule of talks, visit the conference website.

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Talk by Professor Manuel Vargas (University of California, San Diego): “The Philosophy of Accidentality”

Professor Manuel Vargas (University of California, San Diego) will be giving the keynote address at the Puget Sound Undergraduate Philosophy Conference on Thursday 1/31 at 5:00pm in Trimble Hall, Trimble Forum.  Here below is his abstract for the talk:

“The Philosophy of Accidentality”

In a now mostly forgotten mid-20th century philosophical tradition, a peculiar quasi-nationalist existentialist project flourished. The animating idea of this tradition was that the agency of individuals is oftentimes structured by culture and norms in subtle ways that merit careful philosophical investigation. This presentation revisits some of those ideas, including the idea that under some conditions agents can be especially aware of the contingent nature of culturally specific norms and values, and that this awareness can produce a particular experience of normative instability. This experience—call it accidentality—turns out to be useful outside of the historical context of its genesis. In particular, thinking about accidentality can illuminate various forms of social subordination and socially-scaffolded agency, including cultural alienation, biculturality, and double consciousness.

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Joseph Stramondo Events Featured in “The Trail”

The Trail recently published an article about the recent Joseph Stramondo events titled “Lecture and documentary engage students in discussion of bioethics and disability.” The article, written by Mary Salmon, can be found on their website.

Although decisions regarding quality of life are entirely up to each individual person, non-disabled people tend to interpret the opinions of those who are disabled as being incorrect or invalid. Non-disabled people assume that adaptive preferences have played a role in compromising these outlooks on life as disabled people have “settled” for something less….

Stramondo continuously argued that the choices disabled people make are autonomous and highly reflective of their own well-being, not influenced by these concepts that non-disabled people have created. In this way, his lecture directly pertained to the philosophy department’s ongoing debates and discussions….

Both Stramondo’s lecture and the documentary are prime examples of the philosophy department’s integration of real-world discussion into its curriculum. Having held other lectures in the past, the department leaders are likely to host engaging events in the future, something Puget Sound students can look forward to.

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Photo courtesy of Rebecca Heald.

 

 

Upcoming Events with Professor Joe Stramondo (San Diego State)

The philosophy department is proud to sponsor a couple of upcoming events on bioethics and disability, featuring Professor Joe Stramondo (San Diego State).

Professor Stramondo will give a lecture next Friday (Oct 26) entitled “Epistemic Authority, Adaptive Preferences, and Judging the Quality of a Life with Disability”. Professor Stramondo is a philosopher, a bioethicist, and an activist whose research centers on how social and political power shapes the institutions and practices of bioethics. The lecture will be on Friday, October 26th, 3pm, at Wyatt 109. More information is available at: https://www.pugetsound.edu/news-and-events/events-calendar/details/lecture-epistemic-authority-adaptive-preferences-and-judging-the-quality-of-a-life-with-disability/2018-10-26/

Here is a preview of the lecture: There are several critiques of the application of idea of adaptive preferences to undercut disabled people who claim they have good lives (Amundson, Barnes, and Goering). There are also arguments against physician assisted suicide that seem to use an argumentative structure that is quite similar to the logic of adaptive preferences (such as a disabled person who has a desire to die has really adapted his preferences such that he prefers something that is sub-optimal only because other, better choices are out of reach). This lecture tries to reconcile these positions by finding a way of parsing between uses of the idea of adaptive preferences that are instances of testimonial injustice against disabled people (as Barnes describes it) and those that genuinely describe a phenomenon in which a person’s preference for physician-assisted suicide is distorted in the ‘sour grapes’ sense.

Before Professor Stramondo’s visit, ASUPS Campus Films will screen during this weekend the documentary Far From The Tree, in which Professor Stramondo is profiled amongst other extraordinary individuals. “This life-affirming documentary encourages us to cherish loved ones for all they are, not who they might have been” (91% on Rotten Tomatoes). There will be six screenings of the documentary at Rausch Auditorium in Macintyre Hall on Friday (10/19) 6pm, 9pm; Saturday (10/20) 6pm, 9pm; and Sunday (10/21) 2pm, 6pm.

These events are sponsored by the Philosophy Department; and co-sponsored by the Bioethics Program, the Center for Intercultural and Civic Engagement (CICE), and the Office of Diversity and Inclusion; with additional support from the Offices of Business and Security Services.