CFP: Upcoming Undergraduate Philosophy Conferences and Philosophy Journals

Several upcoming undergraduate philosophy conferences and undergraduate philosophy journals have put out calls for papers. You are highly encouraged to submit any of your outstanding philosophical work. For more information about submitting your work, visit their websites.

Students whose work is accepted to present at a conference can apply for a travel grant from the university. More details about student travel awards are on the university website.

Moral and Political Philosophy at the Border Conference
Conference Dates: April 26–27, 2019
Submission Deadline:
December 15, 2018
Keynote speaker: 
Dr. Christine Straehle (University of Ottawa) & Sukaina Hirji (Virginia Tech)

24th Annual SUNY Oneonta Undergraduate Philosophy Conference
Conference Dates: April 12–13, 2019
Submission Deadline: December 15, 2018

Great Lakes Philosophy Conference
Conference Dates: April 5–7, 2019
Submission Deadline: December 15, 2018
Keynote Speaker: Robert Audi, University of Notre Dame

Fifth Annual Southern Utah University Undergraduate Philosophy Conference
Conference Dates: March 23, 2019
Submission Deadline:
January 12, 2019

Dianoia: The Undergraduate Philosophy Journal of Boston College
Submission Deadline: January 25, 2019

SLU Undergraduate Philosophy Conference
Conference Dates: March 29–30, 2019
Submission Deadline:
January 31, 2019
Keynote Speaker: David Wong, Duke University

Gonzaga University Undergraduate Conference
Conference Dates: April 12–13, 2019
Submission Deadline: February 15, 2019

Rowan University Regional Undergraduate Ethics Conference
Conference Dates: April 12, 2019
Submission Deadline:
February 22, 2019

Elie Wiesel Foundation for Humanity 2019 Prize in Ethics Essay Contest

The Elie Wiesel Foundation for Humanity has announced their 2019 Prize in Ethics Essay Contest. The Foundation challenges college level juniors and seniors to submit their work analyzing the urgent ethical issues confronting them in today’s complex world.
The submission deadline is Friday, December 14, 2018 at 5pm PST.

Awards:

  • First Prize – $ 5,000
  • Second Prize – $ 2,500
  • Third Prize – $ 1,500
  • Two Honorable Mentions – $ 500 Each

Eligibility:

  • Registered undergraduate full-time Juniors or Seniors at accredited four-year colleges or universities in the United States during the Fall 2018 Semester.

2019 Essay Topic:

Articulate with clarity an ethical issue that you have encountered and analyze what it has taught you about ethics and yourself. Note that the most engaging essays often reflect deeply on a particularly meaningful experience or episode in one’s life. That approach could focus ethical reflection on:

A personal issue
A family matter
A travel incident
An academic inquiry
A dilemma in literature or film
A recent article or editorial in a major newspaper
A current conflict in American life
An international crisis

Write about any specific topic you wish, provided it explores an ethical problem, question, issue, or concern.

For more information please visit their website.

CFP: Upcoming Undergraduate Philosophy Conferences and Philosophy Journals

Several upcoming undergraduate philosophy conferences and undergraduate philosophy journals have put out calls for papers. You are highly encouraged to submit any of your outstanding philosophical work. For more information about submitting your work, visit their websites.

STANCE International Undergraduate Philosophy Journal
Submission Deadline: 
December 14, 2018

Georgia State Student Philosophy Symposium
Conference Dates: February 22, 2019
Submission Deadline: December 20, 2018, 12 noon ET
Keynote speaker: Professor Michael Monahan, University of Memphis

Mudd Undergraduate Conference in Ethics
Conference Dates: March 16–17, 2019
Submission Deadline: December 31, 2018

Eastern Michigan University’s 9th Annual Undergraduate Conference in Philosophy
Conference Dates: March 9–10, 2019
Submission Deadline: January 10, 2019
Keynote Speaker: Kirsten Jacobson, University of Maine

Midsouth Undergraduate Philosophy Conference
Conference Dates: March 22–23, 2019
Submission Deadline: January 15, 2019

Rutgers Columbia Undergraduate Conference 2019
Conference Dates: April 6, 2019
Submission Deadline:January 17, 2019
Keynote Speakers: Susanna Schellenberg, Rutgers University and Achille Varzi, Columbia University

The 23rd Annual Pacific University Undergraduate Philosophy Conference Conference Dates: April 5–6, 2019
Submission Deadline: February 1, 2019
Keynote Speaker: Susan Haack, University of Miami

 

Students Sam Lilly ’19 and Colleen Hanson ’19 Present their Summer Research at the 2018 AHSS Symposium

Each year, students may apply to the summer research program for undergraduates in the arts, humanities and social sciences. Recipients of a summer research grant devote the summer to their independent research project and prepare to present their work at the Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences (AHSS) Symposium. This year, two seniors in the Philosophy Department were AHSS recipients.

Sam Lilly ’19, presented “An Ethnographic, Experimental Philosophical Inquiry into Attitudes and Perceptions Toward Suicidality.”

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Colleen Hanson ’19 presented “A Philosophical Approach to the Standardization of Hospital Ethics Services.” 

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Colleen Hanson ’19: “A Philosophical Approach to the Standardization of Hospital Ethics Services.” 

Philosophy major Colleen Hanson ’19 received a Summer Research Award in the Humanities and Social Sciences (information on the Summer Research Grants in Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences is available here). She describes her experience working on her summer research project under the supervision of Prof. Ariela Tubert Department of Philosophy:

My inspiration for this research project came after I read a study called “Ethics Consultation in United States Hospitals: A National Survey” by Ellen Fox, Sarah Myers, and Robert A. Pearlman. The goal of the study was to investigate Ethics Consultation Services in hospitals throughout the United States. In healthcare, ethics consultation services (ECS) are committees of medical experts, social workers, philosophers, legal experts, chaplains, and others who work with patients to ensure their care is supported with the utmost ethical considerations. These committees investigate patient care through critical examinations of ethical principles and moral expectations. Fox et al. found the following information about ethics specific training for ethics consultation providers:

5% completed a fellowship or graduate degree program in bioethics; 41% had formal, direct training by a member of an ECS; 45% had NO formal, direct training by a member of an ECS. These numbers intrigued me, particularly the lack of formal education or training from experienced members of ECSs. Was this an indication that a fellowship or graduate degree program was not as valuable as intuition would suggest? Is it necessary to have a foundation in ethical theory in order to practice ethics consultation? 

Given my philosophical background, I wanted to examine these considerations from a philosophical perspective. In particular, my project drew on research regarding the relation of normative ethical theories and applied ethics. To supplement these examinations, I shadowed a Bioethicist at MultiCare Health System and analyzed their policy decision making (specifically lung transplantation in cases of donation after circulatory death) and ethics case assessment. Ultimately, I urged hospital ethics consultation services to maintain a robust, interdisciplinary ethics committee. Furthermore, I emphasized the value of having at least one participant with a formal education in bioethics or a related ethics topic.

Conducting summer research enriched my passion for philosophy and clinical ethics. Not only did I enjoy the philosophical literature and the clinical field work, but I found new ways to be proud of my discipline and my academic pursuits. This project affirmed for me that I chose the right major and that philosophy is integral to every aspect of our lives. Graduation is only a few months away, but I cannot imagine my philosophical endeavors ending there. 

colleenAHSS

Samantha Lilly ’19: “An Ethnographic, Experimental Philosophical Inquiry into Attitudes and Perceptions Toward Suicidality.”

Philosophy major Samantha Lilly ’19 received a Summer Research Award in the Humanities and Social Sciences (information on the Summer Research Grants in Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences is available here). She describes her experience working on her summer research project under the supervision of Prof. Andrew Gardner in the Department of Sociology & Anthropology:
My summer research was an attempt to amalgamate the logical approach of my philosophy major, with the data collection methods of the ethnographer, to be able to better answer a fundamental question of philosophy, “is suicide wrong?” The philosophical approach to answering questions gives me the ability to utilize logic to create normative claims about how things ought to be. In other words, philosophical research allows me to answer the question, “is suicide wrong?” while ethnography gives me the substantiated qualitative data to answer  the essential follow-up question, “how do we know?”
Spring semester 2018, I finished research designed to help answer the very question my current research is aimed at solving. My spring research, however, investigated the United States mental health care system’s understanding of suicidality. I sought the accounts of the mental health care professionals’ run-ins with suicidal behaviors and stories they encountered with their patients. Here, I used the same ethnographic methodology as a warrant for different normative ethical claims on how the United States Mental Healthcare System ought to approach their understanding of mental health, illness, and suicide.
This summer, my research shifted its focus from the contradictory medical model of mental health to individuals who have been bereaved by suicide.  The ethnographic research design utilized semi-structured interviews to collect data from thirteen individuals who have lost a loved one by suicide. The research design also included elements of participant observation conducted within a suicide bereavement group located within the state of Washington. These people all varied in age (20 years old to 80 years old), in walks of life, and in grieving experiences. Some participants lost mothers and brothers, whereas others, lost daughters and partners. After transcribing and coding each of the interviews, I found that each interviewee reported grieving in a way that strays significantly from the traditional grief model and the typical reactions portrayed by modern media. What is more, is that with each story of death, heartache, and grief, each individual described an extreme confusion in how to feel toward their loved one and how they ended up dying. Ultimately, my summer research revealed a unique expectation placed on individuals bereaved by suicide; on the one hand, they are told and expected to understand their loved one’s death as irrational (as a result of mental illness), and on the other, they are expected and told to hold their loved one accountable, i.e., “they chose to kill themselves”, “they left me”, etc.
Philosophically speaking, the ways survivors understand their loved one’s death are at odds with one another. They are told to pin tricky discussions concerning free will against conversations on moral culpability. My job as a researcher and philosopher continues as I attempt to parse out ethical and normative ways we can mitigate this confusion and harm done—not only to those who have been bereaved— but those who have died as well.
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CFP: MSU Denver’s Fourth Annual Undergraduate Women’s Philosophy Conference

Metropolitan State University of Denver have put out a call for papers for their Annual Undergraduate Women’s Philosophy Conference from April 5-7, 2019. See the message and call for papers below from MSU Professors Carol Quinn and Liz Goodnick:

Profs Carol Quinn and Liz Goodnick are excited to announce MSU Denver’s Fourth Annual Undergraduate Women’s Philosophy Conference, April 5-7, 2019. This is the only conference of its kind. It’s an incredible experience of shared scholarship and community building, and it keeps growing!

For the third year in a row, we are happy to announce a $500 prize for the student with the best paper who will also serve as our student keynote speaker. Our faculty keynote speaker this year is Tina Rulli, Assistant Professor of Philosophy, UC Davis.

For the second year in a row, we are holding a lottery to pay for hotel and airfare for one student. Please circulate this call for papers with your students and faculty, and with any of your contacts outside of your institution. Help us get the word out!

We hope to see you and your students next year at this exciting event.

Carol and Liz