CFA: 2019 Ethics and Broader Considerations of Technology Conference (University of Nebraska–Lincoln)

University of Nebraska–Lincoln have sent out a call for abstracts for their 2019 Ethics and Broader Considerations of Technology Conference. Submissions should be on topics of ethics and technology. This conference is open to both undergraduate and graduate students. Prof. Tubert will be a featured speaker at this conference.

Submission Deadline: June 15, 2019
Conference Dates: October 31–November 2, 2019

Students are also invited to create a game about ethics and technology for the The Ethics and Technology Game Jam.

For more information about submission requirements, featured speakers, or other conference inquiries, visit the conference website.

2019 Fall Ethics and Technology conference

Brian Kim ’21 Presents at 2019 Pacific University Undergraduate Philosophy Conference

Brian Kim ’21, a double major in Philosophy and Economics with a minor in Sociology & Anthropology, presented his work at the annual Pacific University Undergraduate Philosophy Conference. The conference was held from April 5–6, 2019 in Forest Grove, Oregon. Brian presented his paper, “A Critique on the Historical Interpretation of Pirates.” In addition, his paper will also be published in Res Cogitans, Pacific University’s undergraduate philosophy journal. Here is an abstract of his paper:  

The history of pirates has been relatively underrepresented by historians, allowing two dominant interpretations to set the standard for how we study these characters. These interpretations, the capitalist and Marxist interpretation, have unfortunately been cherry picking factual evidence in order to legitimize themselves. While both have merits, I propose an existentialist framework which captures the strengths of both interpretations while dropping the glaring weaknesses of them. As pirates most often began as oppressed navy sailors or seafaring workers in poverty, their transition to become pirates captures an important case study of freedom and choice. I first sketch a background of existentialism and both why and how it is a relevant and legitimate interpretation of pirates. I will critique the dominant interpretations, then offer the new existentialist interpretation and compare it to the dominant views. Finally, I conclude with the importance of adopting my framework over the dominant ones within the context of producing good historical analysis.
Brian reflected on his experience at the conference by saying:
Overall, I thought that the conference was an invaluable, enriching experience! This was my first conference that I presented at and it was fascinating not only to listen to a plethora of interesting and important philosophical topics, but also to get a further look into philosophy culture and meeting unique individuals from all over the States. It was a good experience to not only go to a conference, learn how to present, and to figure out what to do, but also to practice engaging critically both for my paper and for others. I met some amazing people, especially the students from PacificU, and had an amazing time not only sharing my passions with like-minded individuals, but to also learn about different styles of philosophical thought and practice.
    ​The conference accepted over 50 different papers and was broken into three 2 hour windows. Within these windows, there were different rooms which each had three papers presenting for 40 minutes each. After a paper was finished, you had a brief window to go to a different room in order to see other papers. At the end of the paper sessions, philosopher Susan Haack presented her topic on a metaphysics in response to the over accepted paradigm of scientific realism. An important thing I noticed overall about the conference was on my own stamina to philosophy. I would like to think of myself as deeply passionate for almost any philosophical topic and could easily go hours discussing even the most trivial issues. But I learned that there is an important lesson in pacing yourself and closing conversations in order to pursue other topics. I found this out about myself after hour five of philosophy conversations, with only a few hours of sleep under my belt, that I have only so much mental energy to offer in one day!
    Overall, I would highly recommend submitting papers to every conference you have the chance to submit to as it is an extraordinary experience to venture into the philosophy undergrad culture and to meet some amazing philosophical minds, as they become exceedingly harder to find nowadays!
BrianKimPacificU

2019 Puget Sound Undergraduate Philosophy Conference Report

From January 31–February 1, 2019, students from the Philosophy Department led the 2019 Puget Sound Undergraduate Philosophy Conference featuring student presenters from around the country. Here are some photos from the event:

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The conference was covered by The Trail, and all accepted papers and corresponding comments are now published in Sound Ideas

Puget Sound Undergraduate Philosophy Conference: January 31–February 1

The fifth Puget Sound Undergraduate Philosophy Conference, run entirely by students, will be from January 31–February 1, 2019. This conference features presentations from undergraduate philosophy scholars from various schools across the country with additional commentary from Puget Sound students.

All presentations, with the exception of the keynote address, are delivered by undergraduate students. For more information about presentation topics, the keynote speaker, and how philosophy students are involved, visit the conference press release.

This conference is free and open to the public. For the conference program with a complete schedule of talks, visit the conference website.

final2019conferenceposter

 

Talk by Professor Manuel Vargas (University of California, San Diego): “The Philosophy of Accidentality”

Professor Manuel Vargas (University of California, San Diego) will be giving the keynote address at the Puget Sound Undergraduate Philosophy Conference on Thursday 1/31 at 5:00pm in Trimble Hall, Trimble Forum.  Here below is his abstract for the talk:

“The Philosophy of Accidentality”

In a now mostly forgotten mid-20th century philosophical tradition, a peculiar quasi-nationalist existentialist project flourished. The animating idea of this tradition was that the agency of individuals is oftentimes structured by culture and norms in subtle ways that merit careful philosophical investigation. This presentation revisits some of those ideas, including the idea that under some conditions agents can be especially aware of the contingent nature of culturally specific norms and values, and that this awareness can produce a particular experience of normative instability. This experience—call it accidentality—turns out to be useful outside of the historical context of its genesis. In particular, thinking about accidentality can illuminate various forms of social subordination and socially-scaffolded agency, including cultural alienation, biculturality, and double consciousness.

final keynote-vargas - phil conference keynote poster jan 2019

CFP: Upcoming Undergraduate Philosophy Conferences and Philosophy Journals

Several upcoming undergraduate philosophy conferences and undergraduate philosophy journals have put out calls for papers. You are highly encouraged to submit any of your outstanding philosophical work. For more information about submitting your work, visit their websites.

Students whose work is accepted to present at a conference can apply for a travel grant from the university. More details about student travel awards are on the university website.

Moral and Political Philosophy at the Border Conference
Conference Dates: April 26–27, 2019
Submission Deadline:
December 15, 2018
Keynote speaker: 
Dr. Christine Straehle (University of Ottawa) & Sukaina Hirji (Virginia Tech)

24th Annual SUNY Oneonta Undergraduate Philosophy Conference
Conference Dates: April 12–13, 2019
Submission Deadline: December 15, 2018

Great Lakes Philosophy Conference
Conference Dates: April 5–7, 2019
Submission Deadline: December 15, 2018
Keynote Speaker: Robert Audi, University of Notre Dame

Fifth Annual Southern Utah University Undergraduate Philosophy Conference
Conference Dates: March 23, 2019
Submission Deadline:
January 12, 2019

Dianoia: The Undergraduate Philosophy Journal of Boston College
Submission Deadline: January 25, 2019

SLU Undergraduate Philosophy Conference
Conference Dates: March 29–30, 2019
Submission Deadline:
January 31, 2019
Keynote Speaker: David Wong, Duke University

Gonzaga University Undergraduate Conference
Conference Dates: April 12–13, 2019
Submission Deadline: February 15, 2019

Rowan University Regional Undergraduate Ethics Conference
Conference Dates: April 12, 2019
Submission Deadline:
February 22, 2019

CFP: Upcoming Undergraduate Philosophy Conferences and Philosophy Journals

Several upcoming undergraduate philosophy conferences and undergraduate philosophy journals have put out calls for papers. You are highly encouraged to submit any of your outstanding philosophical work. For more information about submitting your work, visit their websites.

STANCE International Undergraduate Philosophy Journal
Submission Deadline: 
December 14, 2018

Georgia State Student Philosophy Symposium
Conference Dates: February 22, 2019
Submission Deadline: December 20, 2018, 12 noon ET
Keynote speaker: Professor Michael Monahan, University of Memphis

Mudd Undergraduate Conference in Ethics
Conference Dates: March 16–17, 2019
Submission Deadline: December 31, 2018

Eastern Michigan University’s 9th Annual Undergraduate Conference in Philosophy
Conference Dates: March 9–10, 2019
Submission Deadline: January 10, 2019
Keynote Speaker: Kirsten Jacobson, University of Maine

Midsouth Undergraduate Philosophy Conference
Conference Dates: March 22–23, 2019
Submission Deadline: January 15, 2019

Rutgers Columbia Undergraduate Conference 2019
Conference Dates: April 6, 2019
Submission Deadline:January 17, 2019
Keynote Speakers: Susanna Schellenberg, Rutgers University and Achille Varzi, Columbia University

The 23rd Annual Pacific University Undergraduate Philosophy Conference Conference Dates: April 5–6, 2019
Submission Deadline: February 1, 2019
Keynote Speaker: Susan Haack, University of Miami