Lecture: “Reconciling Environmental Heritage by Transformative Justice: Confronting Environmental Racism Century after Century”

The Department of Philosophy and the Environmental Policy & Decision Making Program are sponsoring a lecture, “Reconciling Environmental Heritage by Transformative Justice: Confronting Environmental Racism Century after Century” by Prof. Robert Melchior Figueroa (Oregon State University) on October 25, 2017. Here is an overview of the talk:

In this talk, Robert Melchior Figueroa will present dimensions of environmental racism from the perspective of critical race theory which provides insights into historical conditions that sustain environmental injustices. Figueroa then contextualizes the discriminatory consequences that recent environmental policies will have upon our environmental heritage. The talk will provide some overview of the current strategies available and those that need to be envisioned in order to address environmental racism and sustain the future of the Environmental Justice Movement.

The Environmental Justice Movement (EJM) is established as a grassroots movement that addresses the inseparability of social justice and environmental conditions. The EJM broadly identifies environmental racism as the unfair and inequitable distribution of environmental burdens compounded by the underrepresentation of people of color in environmental decision-making.  Thirty years ago, the EJM claimed a signifying milestone with the released study Toxic Wastes and Race in the United States, sponsored by the United Church of Christ Commission on Racial Justice. The study investigated the ways in which environmental burdens, such as hazardous waste facilities and industrial toxics sites, are targeted at communities of ethnic and racial minorities, as well as poor communities, compared to white and/or affluent communities. Over the past 30 years, Toxic Wastes and Race has been repeated twice, and thousands of studies directly and comparatively continue to address environmental racism in the US. In recent years, communities like Flint, MI; Kettleman City, CA; and the Standing Rock Sioux, demonstrate continued struggles against environmental racism.

Robert Melchior Figueroa is Associate Professor of Environmental Justice and Philosophy at Oregon State University’s School of History, Philosophy, and Religion. He is also the Director of the Environmental Justice Project for the Center of Environmental Philosophy. He has written numerous publications on environmental justice since 1991, addressing conditions and cases of environmental racism in the U.S. and abroad. Figueroa has added a theoretical framework to environmental justice studies and expanded dimensions of justice to address indigenous environmental heritage, Latinx environmental identity, critical disability studies, climate refugees, refugee resettlement, climate justice, national and international environmental policy, ecotourism, environmental colonialism, and gender/transgender environmental politics. Figueroa is co-editor of Science and Other Cultures: Issues in the Philosophies of Science and Technology, with Sandra Harding (Routledge 2003). He is currently working on two books and is editing a book series on environmental justice.

Date: Wednesday, October 25, 2017
Time: 5 pm–6:30 pm
Location: Wyatt Hall, Room 109
Figueroa

Article: Minnesota professor explores link between philosophy and Lego

An article published to StarTribune overviews the philosophical implications of Legos discussed in the book LEGO and Philosophy: Constructing Reality Brick by Brick by University of Minnesota philosophy professor Roy T. Cook. StarTribune contributor Richard Chin provides a brief summary of the topics discussed in Cook’s book:

Nearly 100 people responded to the call for essays, 21 of which are in the book. The essayists, many of them fellow philosophy professors, dove into issues about Lego and gender stereotypes, Lego and ethics, Lego and the nature of impermanence, Lego and German philosopher Martin Heidegger, Lego and autonomy and the human individual (Lego my ego?).

Visit the article to read more.

Featured image courtesy of http://ew.com/news/2017/02/28/hidden-figures-katherine-johnson-lego/

 

Info Session for Spring 2018 Travel Seminar on Argentina

Stop by to learn about Spring 2018 course:
LAS 399 Latin American Travel Seminar / Argentina: Modernity and Its Discontents
taught by Prof. Lanctot (Hispanic Studies) and Prof. Tubert (Philosophy)

Wednesday, October 4th, 4pm in Wyatt 313

The course satisfies the Connections requirements offers an interdisciplinary examination of the processes of modernization and nation-building in Argentina through the analysis of key primary sources (in translation) and culminating in an immersive, 3-week trip to Argentina upon the conclusion of the semester.  

For more information regarding the course, application process, and costs please come to the information session or contact blanctot@pugetsound.edu or atubert@pugetsound.edu.

PosterArgentinaCourse

Philosophy Talk: “The Perfect Bikini Body: Can We Really All Have It? Loving Gaze as an Anti-Oppressive Beauty Ideal”

The Department of Philosophy is sponsoring a lecture, “The Perfect Bikini Body: Can We Really All Have It? Loving Gaze as an Anti-Oppressive Beauty Ideal” by professor Sara Protasi on September 22, 2017.  Professor Protasi tells us about her talk:
“We often hear the slogan that ‘everybody is beautiful.’ But what does that mean? This talk examines two possible interpretations, rejects both, and proposes a third one. According to the ‘No Standards View,’ the slogan means that everybody is maximally and equally beautiful. According to the ‘Multiple Standards View,’ the slogan means that we have to widen our standards of beauty. The former fails to be aspirational and empowering, while the latter fails to be sufficiently inclusive. I propose a third view, according to which everybody is beautiful in the sense that everybody can be perceived through a loving gaze (with the exception of evil individuals who are wholly unworthy of love). I show that this view is inclusive, aspirational, and empowering, and authentically aesthetical.”
Date: September 22, 2017
Time: 4 p.m.–5:30 p.m.
Location: Wheelock Student Center
Rasmussen Rotunda

CALL FOR PAPERS: Undergraduate Philosophy Conferences and Publication Opportunities

In the next few months, there are several opportunities to submit papers for publication and for undergraduate philosophy conferences. Visit their websites for more details on submitting.

Students whose work is accepted to present at a conference can apply for a travel grant from the university. More details about student travel awards are on the university website. 

Eighth Mid-Hudson Undergraduate Philosophy Conference

Submission Deadline: September 11, 2017

Conference Dates: October 27, 2017 – October 28, 2017

Undergraduate Research and SoTL Poster Session: Teaching Hub, American Philosophical Association

Submission Deadline: October 1, 2017

Conference Dates: March 29, 2018 – March 30, 2018

California Undergraduate Philosophy Journal

Submission Deadline: October 15, 2017

Vassar College Undergraduate Journal of Philosophy

Submission Deadline: October 20, 2017

Third Annual Conference of The Mudd Journal of Ethics

Submission Deadline: December 31, 2017

Conference Dates: March 10, 2018 – March 11, 2018

Can an Immortal Life Retain its Meaning?

In a video presentation for Professor Tubert’s first year seminar Life, Death, and Meaning, Jordan Santiago Pearson aims to answer the question: can an immortal life retain its meaning?

Pearson spent several weeks in the hospital during the semester, so his presentation incorporates his personal narrative in regards to “meaning.”

“I found that an individual’s own desires give life meaning, and that as absurd as life is, it is only meaningless if one allows it to be so.”

Congratulations 2017 Philosophy Graduates!

This past weekend, we got a chance to celebrate another great group of philosophy graduates.  We wish them all the best as they move on to another stage in their lives!

Grads2017

At Philosophy Graduation Reception – from left Rae, Quinelle, Eileen, Chase, Bryan, Steven, Jack, Nate, Dilara, Matt

GradsFac2017

At Philosophy Graduation Reception – Nate, Prof. Tubert, Eileen, Chase, Prof. Protasi, Steven, Rae, Prof. Liao, Quinelle, Prof. Tiehen, Prof. Beardsley

Graduation 2017

from left: Eileen, Nate, Chase, Jack, Dilara, Matt, Steven, Gryphon, Reagan