Call for Papers: Northwest Student Philosophy Conference

Northwest Student Philosophy Conference Call for Papers

The Northwest Student Philosophy Conference (NWSPC) is an annual conference organized by undergraduate students at Western Washington University and aims to showcase the philosophical research of undergraduate, graduate and professional philosophers. Our keynote speaker will be Thomas M. Crisp from Biola University. He will be lecturing on immigrant and refugee ethics, arguing that affluent nations have greater obligations toward immigrants and refugees than is typically recognized. Last year our keynote speaker was Heather Battaly. In the past several years, we have been privileged to host Alex Guerrero, Meghan Sullivan, Carrie Jenkins, Jonathan Ichikawa, Kris McDaniel, Ben Bradley, Shieva Kleinschmidt, Laurie Paul, Kit Fine, Michael Rea, Dean Zimmerman, and Jonathan Schaffer as keynote and guest speakers.

This year, our conference will be taking place from May 26-28. Both graduate and undergraduate students are invited to submit papers. Papers can be on any philosophical topic, and should be at least 2,000 words in length, but preferably no longer than 15,000. Entrance is fairly competitive, as we have only 6-8 open slots for student presentations, but this should not discourage interested applicants. The submission deadline is March 17th.

HOW TO SUBMIT PAPERS:

• Prepare your paper for blind review • Provide an abstract around 200 words between the title and main text of the paper • Send a copy as an attachment (either as word document or pdf) to Ryan.Wasserman@wwu.edu • Provide relevant contact information (Name / Institution / Email / Phone) in any emails sent.

For additional information regarding the conference, as well as information on WWU, our philosophy club and our philosophy department, please visit our website.

Please feel free to email us at antala@wwu.edu with any questions you may have.

Call for Papers: Pacific University Undergraduate Philosophy Conference

Call for Papers: 21st Annual Pacific University Undergraduate Philosophy Conference

April 21-22, 2017 |  Pacific University | Forest Grove, Oregon | Keynote talk by Alva Noë (University of California, Berkeley) 

The 21st annual Pacific University Undergraduate Philosophy Conference will be held April 21-22, 2017 on the campus of Pacific University, in Forest Grove, Oregon. The purpose of this conference is to provide a forum for the presentation of philosophical work of undergraduates to their peers. Papers are required to be of philosophical content, but there are no specific restrictions on subject matter within the arena of philosophical discussion itself. Papers should be approximately 3000 words (10-12 pages). Electronic submissions, including paper and abstract (Word documents), should be sent to: ian.oloughlin@pacificu.edu.Submission deadline is February 1, 2017Final decisions will be made by February 28, 2017. Volunteers for session chairs are also welcome.

Selected papers from the conference will be published in Volume 8 (2017) of the journal Res CogitansThis is strictly an undergraduate conference, with only undergraduates allowed on the conference program. The single exception is the keynote speaker. Past keynotes speakers have included: Elliot Sober, Paul Churchland, Hilary Putnam, John Searle, Keith Lehrer, Catherine Elgin, John Perry, Hubert Dreyfus, Jerry Fodor, Alvin Plantinga, Cora Diamond, James Sterba, Peter Kivy, Walter Sinnott-Armstrong, Daniel Dennett, and Elliott Sober. This year’s keynote talk will be by Alva Noë.The conference banquet will be on Friday, April 21 and all paper sessions, including the keynote talk, will be on Saturday, April 22. Travel and lodging information can be found by going to the conference web site at: www.pacificu.edu/as/philosophy/conference

Registration costs: $50, payable at the conference. Three meals will be provided: Friday night banquet, Saturday breakfast and lunch.

For further information, contact Professor O’Loughlin via email (ian.oloughlin@pacificu.edu) or by phone (503 352 1547) or at the address: Dept. of Philosophy, Pacific University, 2043 College Way, Forest Grove, OR 97116

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Alumni Profiles: Brenden Goetz

Philosophy majors pursue a wide variety of career paths after graduation, including but not limited to law, business, and higher education. Every few weeks, we will be featuring one of our department’s alumni, highlighting how their studies in philosophy have helped them in their post-graduate careers.

Brenden Goetz graduated in 2007 with a degree in Philosophy. He now works as a Data Manager for the University of Colorado at Denver IT Department. When asked how studying philosophy has helped him in his career, he said:

“Studying philosophy was definitely a fantastic decision! Learning to dissect arguments and lines of reasoning, ask meaningful questions, and communicate clearly are skills I developed in school and use all the time. And a general curiosity for getting to the root of problems has served me well, too.”

Rutgers Summer Institute for Diversity in Philosophy

The American Philosophical Association, with support from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, offers several undergraduate diversity institutes in philosophy. The goal of these institutes is to encourage and support undergraduates from underrepresented groups in philosophy.

19th Annual Rutgers Summer Institute for Diversity in Philosophy

Rutgers University will sponsor the 2017 Summer Institute for Diversity in Philosophy. This seven-day program is designed to introduce undergraduate students from diverse backgrounds to the various areas of specialization within the discipline of philosophy, give students a better idea of what graduate studies in philosophy is about, and explore various views about what it means to be a professional philosopher. Up to fifteen students will be given the opportunity to interact in formal and informal settings with a group of talented graduate students and distinguished faculty members from a number of universities.

Eligible students must demonstrate how their experiences and background foster greater diversity in the discipline of philosophy and be full-time students in a college or university in the United States (preference will be given to sophomores and juniors, though others are eligible). Interested students must be in good academic standing and be interested in philosophy as a career. The Institute will provide travel, room and board, and a $250 stipend. This year’s program will be held at the Continuing Studies & Conference Center in New Brunswick, NJ. Applications must be completed and submitted to the 2017 Summer Institute for Diversity in Philosophy and postmarked no later than May 8, 2017.

For more information, visit their website.

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Call for Papers: Puget Sound Philosophy Day

The Puget Sound Department of Philosophy is now accepting papers for Philosophy Day. Philosophy Day will be on Friday, February 17, 2017.  Submission deadline is January 13, 2017. 

Papers selected for presentation will be allotted 20 minute presentation times, followed by 10 minutes of Q&A. Submitted papers should have been written for a Philosophy class at the University of Puget Sound (including classes not numbered in PHIL but taught by a professor in the Philosophy Department).

Send submissions (prepared for anonymous review, in Microsoft Word, .rtf, or .txt format) as an email attached to pugetsoundphilosophy@gmail.com no later than January 13, 2017. In the body of the email include the author’s name, contact information, and the title of the paper. Include no identifying information in the file with the paper. Papers will be selected by a panel of alumni.

Email pugetsoundphilosophy@gmail.com with any questions.

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Professor Tiehen Publishes on Ad Populum

Professor Justin Tiehen recently published a blog post on Ad Populum about how statistics of tweets about anti-Semitism may be misleading. You can read the post here.

“More realistically, a scenario in which lots and lots of people are writing occasional anti-Semitic tweets while a few people are writing tons of them (70% worth) doesn’t seem like much of an improvement on a scenario with the same overall number of people writing anti-Semitic tweets but with a more equal distribution. If this is right, the 70%-1,600 figure seems like the wrong way to try to get a handle on the extent of the problem.”

 

 

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Alumni Profiles: Sarah Jacobson

Philosophy majors pursue a wide variety of career paths after graduation, including but not limited to law, business, and higher education. Every few weeks, we will be featuring one of our department’s alumni, highlighting how their studies in philosophy have helped them in their post-graduate careers.

Sarah Jacobson graduated in 2005 with a degree in Philosophy. She now works as a Transit Control Supervisor for the Minneapolis Metro Transit. When asked how studying philosophy has helped her in her career, she said:

“My philosophy degree helped me transition into management positions easily, since I have superior critical thinking and problem solving skills and excellent written and oral communication. My career didn’t turn out as planned, but even so, I think my degree set me up to succeed.”