CFP: Ethics and Social Justice Prize

Fordham University’s Center for Ethics Education is organizing a new national undergraduate essay competition, the Ethics and Social Justice Essay Prize. This competition is open to all college seniors at accredited 4-year colleges and universities in the U.S. The competition, which has a top prize of $1,000, is intended to amplify historically underrepresented voices and perspectives on issues of societal import, and to encourage thoughtful reflection and critical thinking about ethical concepts as they are encountered personally and as members of society committed to social justice.

The theme for the 2020 competition is: Racial Justice: Realities and Possibilities.

Deadline: December 1, 2020.

For more information, including eligibility and submission information, please visit the essay prize’s website!

Women’s Philosophy Conference

The Metropolitan State University of Denver is presenting a conference for female and non-binary undergraduate philosophers to showcase their work. The goal of this conference is to provide a forum for female and non-binary undergraduates to connect with peers and engage in a welcoming, philosophical community. All genders are welcome to attend the conference or to serve as commentators or session chairs and help build this community further.

To be considered for presenting at this conference, students are asked to submit an 8-10 page philosophical paper. There are no restrictions on the subject matter but diverse perspectives are highly encouraged.

The submission deadline is January 24, 2020, and the acceptance notifications will be out by February 10, 2020. A $500 prize is offered for the best paper. To submit a paper, electronic submissions should be sent to egoodnic@msudenver.edu.

If your paper is accepted, you can apply for a University of Puget Sound travel award here

This conference is a wonderful opportunity to engage in a community centered around inclusivity and diversity in philosophy. If you’re interested, look here for information on previous conferences.

Great Lakes Philosophy Conference — Ethics in Action

Sienna Heights University is calling on students with a passion for ethics in the world today! The Great Lakes Philosophy Conference will be held in Adrian, Michigan on April 3rd through April 5th, 2020.

To be considered in joining this conference, students are asked to write papers related to the theme of “Ethics in Action.” Possible paper topics include trends in ethics, interpersonal ethics, social ethics, ethics within and across disciplines and specialties, the intersection of ethics and politics, applied and professional ethics, metaethics, and ethical theory, but alternative prompts are welcome as well. The official submission requirement page is here.

A special stream will be featured for presentations relating to the topic of “The Crisis of American Democracy.” The goal for these presentations will be to compile them into a publication as conference proceedings.

All undergraduate and graduate students are welcome to submit a paper. Final papers should be appropriate for a 20-30 minute presentation and contribute to an inclusive, collaborative environment. To submit a paper, you will need to submit an abstract of up to 500 words here. The deadline for submissions is on January 1st, 2020 and the deadline for acceptance notifications is on January 8th, 2020. There are $100 respective prizes for the best undergraduate and graduate student papers.

If your paper is accepted to be presented at the Great Lakes Conference, you can apply for a travel award here!

This is a wonderful opportunity to get involved with people from all sorts of different fields and professions! If you have any questions, email lharper3@sienaheights.edu for more information.

Philosophy Party: October 25th!

Happy midterms everyone! Hopefully, things aren’t too stressful, but luckily the Philosophy Department has the perfect way to unwind!

On Friday, October 25th, the Philosophy Department will be hosting an event for all philosophy majors, minors, or any students interested in philosophy — come by for an afternoon of games and free food! It will be hosted from 3:30p.m. to 5:00p.m. in the University Club on 1302 N. Alder Street.

Hope to see you there!

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Philosopher Kate Manne to Deliver 2019 Brown and Haley Lectures

Originated in 1953, Brown and Haley became the first fully endowed lectureship in the history of the University of Puget Sound in 1981. The lectures are intended to make significant contributions to the understanding of urgent problems confronting society, emphasizing perspectives in the social sciences or humanities. During their two-day residency, the invited speaker not only delivers two public lectures, but also visits two classes and interacts with faculty and students outside of the classroom. In recent years, the committee has especially focused on bringing in emerging scholars whose work transcends disciplinary boundaries.

For 2019, we are very pleased to have philosopher Kate Manne, Associate Professor of Philosophy at Cornell University, as the Brown and Haley lecturer. Manne will give two free public talks on September 18 and 19, at 7pm, in the Tahoma Room in Thomas Hall. Her first talk is titled “What is Misogyny? Concepts, Targets, and Triggers”, and her second talk is titled “Unassuming: On Epistemic Entitlement, Mansplaining, and Gaslighting”.

Manne’s work on misogyny has received international recognition. Her first book, Down Girl: The Logic of Misogyny, was chosen as one of the “books of the year” by Times Higher Education, Washington Post, and The Big Issue; and it recently won the 2019 PROSE Award for Excellence in Humanities. In addition to her academic work, she has published political and cultural commentary in The New York Times, Newsweek, Times Literary Supplement, and more. For her scholarship and influence, Dr. Manne has been recently recognized as one of Prospect Magazine’s Top 50 World Thinkers.

Join the GQS & Philosophy Summer Book Club

This summer, the Gender & Queer Studies and Philosophy Book Club will be meeting to discuss Prof. Kate Manne’s work Down Girl. These meetings are open to all and lunch will be provided at every meeting. Contact nkranzdorf@pugetsound.edu for more information.

Kate Manne is an assistant professor of the Sage School of Philosophy at Cornell University. She will be guest lecturing from September 18-19, 2019 as part of the Brown and Haley lecture series.

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CFA: 2019 Ethics and Broader Considerations of Technology Conference (University of Nebraska–Lincoln)

University of Nebraska–Lincoln have sent out a call for abstracts for their 2019 Ethics and Broader Considerations of Technology Conference. Submissions should be on topics of ethics and technology. This conference is open to both undergraduate and graduate students. Prof. Tubert will be a featured speaker at this conference.

Submission Deadline: June 15, 2019
Conference Dates: October 31–November 2, 2019

Students are also invited to create a game about ethics and technology for the The Ethics and Technology Game Jam.

For more information about submission requirements, featured speakers, or other conference inquiries, visit the conference website.

2019 Fall Ethics and Technology conference

UPS Ethics Bowl Team Competes in First Ever Intercollegiate Ethics Bowl at the Washington Corrections Center for Women (WCCW)

The Puget Sound Ethics Bowl team competed in the first ever Intercollegiate Ethics Bowl at the Washington Corrections Center for Women (WCCW) on April 14, 2019. The University of Puget Sound and the the Freedom Education Project Puget Sound (FEPPS) teams debated questions such as: Should we bring back species that have been driven to extinction? Are laws allowing terminally ill children to choose euthanasia morally defensible? Is China’s social credit system, which assigns a social credit score based on behavior, morally justified? Do wealthy nations owe a climate debt obligation toward less-wealthy nations? 

FEPPS describes their mission as being:

A rigorous college program for incarcerated women, trans-identified and gender nonconforming people in Washington and creates pathways to higher education after students are released from prison. Our goals are to increase FEPPS students’ economic and personal empowerment, contribute to family stability and reduce recidivism through college education.

The event was sponsored by Freedom Education Project Puget Sound and the University of Washington, Philosophy Department.

This event was also made possible by Paul Tubig, a Philosophy PhD candidate at University of Washington. In addition to coaching the FEPPS team, Paul established ethics bowl at WCCW and organized the event.

Visit the FEPPS Facebook page to read more about the event.

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Left table: FEPPS ethics bowl team

Middle table: Puget Sound Ethics Bowl team

Right table: Judges and moderator

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Paul Tubig

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Brian Kim ’21 Presents at 2019 Pacific University Undergraduate Philosophy Conference

Brian Kim ’21, a double major in Philosophy and Economics with a minor in Sociology & Anthropology, presented his work at the annual Pacific University Undergraduate Philosophy Conference. The conference was held from April 5–6, 2019 in Forest Grove, Oregon. Brian presented his paper, “A Critique on the Historical Interpretation of Pirates.” In addition, his paper will also be published in Res Cogitans, Pacific University’s undergraduate philosophy journal. Here is an abstract of his paper:  

The history of pirates has been relatively underrepresented by historians, allowing two dominant interpretations to set the standard for how we study these characters. These interpretations, the capitalist and Marxist interpretation, have unfortunately been cherry picking factual evidence in order to legitimize themselves. While both have merits, I propose an existentialist framework which captures the strengths of both interpretations while dropping the glaring weaknesses of them. As pirates most often began as oppressed navy sailors or seafaring workers in poverty, their transition to become pirates captures an important case study of freedom and choice. I first sketch a background of existentialism and both why and how it is a relevant and legitimate interpretation of pirates. I will critique the dominant interpretations, then offer the new existentialist interpretation and compare it to the dominant views. Finally, I conclude with the importance of adopting my framework over the dominant ones within the context of producing good historical analysis.
Brian reflected on his experience at the conference by saying:
Overall, I thought that the conference was an invaluable, enriching experience! This was my first conference that I presented at and it was fascinating not only to listen to a plethora of interesting and important philosophical topics, but also to get a further look into philosophy culture and meeting unique individuals from all over the States. It was a good experience to not only go to a conference, learn how to present, and to figure out what to do, but also to practice engaging critically both for my paper and for others. I met some amazing people, especially the students from PacificU, and had an amazing time not only sharing my passions with like-minded individuals, but to also learn about different styles of philosophical thought and practice.
    ​The conference accepted over 50 different papers and was broken into three 2 hour windows. Within these windows, there were different rooms which each had three papers presenting for 40 minutes each. After a paper was finished, you had a brief window to go to a different room in order to see other papers. At the end of the paper sessions, philosopher Susan Haack presented her topic on a metaphysics in response to the over accepted paradigm of scientific realism. An important thing I noticed overall about the conference was on my own stamina to philosophy. I would like to think of myself as deeply passionate for almost any philosophical topic and could easily go hours discussing even the most trivial issues. But I learned that there is an important lesson in pacing yourself and closing conversations in order to pursue other topics. I found this out about myself after hour five of philosophy conversations, with only a few hours of sleep under my belt, that I have only so much mental energy to offer in one day!
    Overall, I would highly recommend submitting papers to every conference you have the chance to submit to as it is an extraordinary experience to venture into the philosophy undergrad culture and to meet some amazing philosophical minds, as they become exceedingly harder to find nowadays!
BrianKimPacificU

Summer Course: Introduction to Philosophy

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If you’ll be in Tacoma this summer, consider taking a course in philosophy. Professor James Garrison will be teaching Introduction to Philosophy during Summer Session I (May 20–June 28, 2019). This course satisfies the Humanistic Approaches core requirement. The course description says: