CALL FOR PAPERS – Sound Decisions: An Undergraduate Bioethics Journal

Sound Decisions: An Undergraduate Bioethics Journal is now taking submissions for peer review and subsequent publication for their Winter volume. Here are their guidelines for submissions:

All papers submitted should be 8-10 pages in length, and have been edited prior to submission to ensure quality work. Students can submit their final papers, which are typically cumulative of a student’s knowledge from taking a course in bioethics. Topics are at the discretion of the student, but some former publications have been on the topic of the ethics of euthanasia, moral considerations of animal testing, animal agriculture, feminist approaches to abortion, rethinking eugenics in genetic engineering, and more.

To submit an article, visit: http://soundideas.pugetsound.edu/sounddecisions/ , make an author account, and follow the instructions to complete the submission process.  If you have any questions about what to submit or the submission process, feel free to email the editors: cokeefe@pugetsound.edu and gpgarcia@pugetsound.edu

We look forward to editing and publishing your papers and widening the bioethics community with your participation!

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CALL FOR PAPERS: Undergraduate Philosophy Conferences and Publication Opportunities

In the next few months, there are several opportunities to submit papers for publication and for undergraduate philosophy conferences. Visit their websites for more details on submitting.

Students whose work is accepted to present at a conference can apply for a travel grant from the university. More details about student travel awards are on the university website.

Stance: An International Undergraduate Philosophy Journal

Submission Deadline: December 15, 2017

Aporia Volume 18, Issue 1 (and Essay Prizes)

Submission Deadline: December 15, 2017

Third Annual Conference of The Mudd Journal of Ethics

Submission Deadline: December 31, 2017
Conference Dates: March 10–11, 2018

22nd Annual Pacific University Undergraduate Philosophy Conference

Submission deadline: February 1, 2018
Conference Dates: April 20–21, 2018

11th Annual DePauw Undergraduate Ethics Symposium

Submission Deadline: February 9, 2018
Conference Dates: April 19 –21, 2018

2nd Annual Gonzaga Undergraduate Philosophy Conference

Submission Deadline: February 18, 2018
Conference Dates: April 21-22, 2018

MSU Denver’s Third Annual Undergraduate Women’s Philosophy Conference

Submission Deadline: February 19th, 2018
Conference Dates: April 13–14, 2018

 

CFP: 2018 DePaw Undergraduate Ethics Symposium

The Janet Prindle Institute for Ethics at DePauw University has announced a call for papers for their 2018 Undergraduate Ethics Symposium. Here is information from the Institute about the event:

The Janet Prindle Institute for Ethics at DePauw University is proud to announce the 11th Annual Undergraduate Ethics Symposium.

The Undergraduate Ethics Symposium will take place from April 19-21, 2018, on the theme of “Representing Disability.”

This symposium is highly inter-disciplinary. In addition to traditional analytic essays, we welcome submissions from undergraduate creative writers, artists, and filmmakers. We believe the arts are an important component to the exploration of ethics in society.

Scholars should submit a paper on a topic of ethical inquiry or exploration. Writers, artists and filmmakers may submit a short story, series of poems, short play, short screenplay or short film in which an ethical topic and/or dilemma is central.

The symposium is held at The Janet Prindle Institute for Ethics at DePauw University, located in a 500 acre nature park. Participating undergraduate students attend seminars with visiting scholars and artists and also hear presentations on the symposium’s theme.

Students who are accepted to the symposium will receive free lodging and meals. Need-based assistance is available for travel. Submissions in all areas of ethical inquiry are encouraged and will be accepted using our online submission form below until February 9, 2018

You can find out more about the symposium and get answers to FAQs on our website. We look forward to receiving submissions from undergraduate students across the U.S.

2018 KEYNOTE SPEAKERS
  • Keah N. Brown, journalist and Senior Entertainment Writer at Cliche Magazine.
  • James Emmett, Owner/CEO at James Emmett Corporation, a disability consulting firm
  • Kevin Timpe, Professor of Philosophy at Calvin College and President of 22 Advocacy, a non-profit advocacy group for children with disabilities

Event on Nov. 3: Philosophy and Beyond

Philosophy and Beyond

Join philosophy faculty members and students to find out where philosophy can lead you! This event will feature a presentation, “From Philosophy to Law,” by alumna Maia Bernick ’15.

Philosophy majors are well-prepared to pursue a wide variety of career interests, because studying philosophy teaches you how to think critically, how to write clearly, and how to reason effectively. Philosophy majors do exceptionally well after graduation— the proof is in the outcomes!

Friday, November 3rd, 4 pm
Wyatt Hall, Room 109

All majors, minors, and all students interested in philosophy are welcome.
Pizza and beverages will be provided.

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SHOT: A Performance by Spectrum Dance Theater

On Wednesday, November 1st at 6 pm in Schneebeck Concert Hall, SHOT will be performed by Spectrum Dance Theater. The performance will be followed by a conversation with choreographer Donald Byrd and the dancers. The event is free and open to the public. Here is a description of the event:

Through visceral and urgent contemporary dance theater, you are invited to contemplate the alarming and continuous murder of black people by American law enforcement. With the police’s ever-expanding authority, supported by recent rulings of the Supreme Court, we ask – when will it stop?  “SHOT” is an unapologetic critique of the current American landscape, where black people find themselves in an intense cycle of fear, intimidation, aggression, and death.

This event is sponsored by the Chism Lecture in Humanities and Arts Endowment, the Matthew Norton Clapp Visiting Artist Fund, the Department of Philosophy, and the Center for Intercultural and Civic Engagement. This event is also supported by African-American Studies, Theater Arts, CWLT, and Gender Queer Studies.

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Lecture: “Reconciling Environmental Heritage by Transformative Justice: Confronting Environmental Racism Century after Century”

The Department of Philosophy and the Environmental Policy & Decision Making Program are sponsoring a lecture, “Reconciling Environmental Heritage by Transformative Justice: Confronting Environmental Racism Century after Century” by Prof. Robert Melchior Figueroa (Oregon State University) on October 25, 2017. Here is an overview of the talk:

In this talk, Robert Melchior Figueroa will present dimensions of environmental racism from the perspective of critical race theory which provides insights into historical conditions that sustain environmental injustices. Figueroa then contextualizes the discriminatory consequences that recent environmental policies will have upon our environmental heritage. The talk will provide some overview of the current strategies available and those that need to be envisioned in order to address environmental racism and sustain the future of the Environmental Justice Movement.

The Environmental Justice Movement (EJM) is established as a grassroots movement that addresses the inseparability of social justice and environmental conditions. The EJM broadly identifies environmental racism as the unfair and inequitable distribution of environmental burdens compounded by the underrepresentation of people of color in environmental decision-making.  Thirty years ago, the EJM claimed a signifying milestone with the released study Toxic Wastes and Race in the United States, sponsored by the United Church of Christ Commission on Racial Justice. The study investigated the ways in which environmental burdens, such as hazardous waste facilities and industrial toxics sites, are targeted at communities of ethnic and racial minorities, as well as poor communities, compared to white and/or affluent communities. Over the past 30 years, Toxic Wastes and Race has been repeated twice, and thousands of studies directly and comparatively continue to address environmental racism in the US. In recent years, communities like Flint, MI; Kettleman City, CA; and the Standing Rock Sioux, demonstrate continued struggles against environmental racism.

Robert Melchior Figueroa is Associate Professor of Environmental Justice and Philosophy at Oregon State University’s School of History, Philosophy, and Religion. He is also the Director of the Environmental Justice Project for the Center of Environmental Philosophy. He has written numerous publications on environmental justice since 1991, addressing conditions and cases of environmental racism in the U.S. and abroad. Figueroa has added a theoretical framework to environmental justice studies and expanded dimensions of justice to address indigenous environmental heritage, Latinx environmental identity, critical disability studies, climate refugees, refugee resettlement, climate justice, national and international environmental policy, ecotourism, environmental colonialism, and gender/transgender environmental politics. Figueroa is co-editor of Science and Other Cultures: Issues in the Philosophies of Science and Technology, with Sandra Harding (Routledge 2003). He is currently working on two books and is editing a book series on environmental justice.

Date: Wednesday, October 25, 2017
Time: 5 pm–6:30 pm
Location: Wyatt Hall, Room 109
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Info Session for Spring 2018 Travel Seminar on Argentina

Stop by to learn about Spring 2018 course:
LAS 399 Latin American Travel Seminar / Argentina: Modernity and Its Discontents
taught by Prof. Lanctot (Hispanic Studies) and Prof. Tubert (Philosophy)

Wednesday, October 4th, 4pm in Wyatt 313

The course satisfies the Connections requirements offers an interdisciplinary examination of the processes of modernization and nation-building in Argentina through the analysis of key primary sources (in translation) and culminating in an immersive, 3-week trip to Argentina upon the conclusion of the semester.  

For more information regarding the course, application process, and costs please come to the information session or contact blanctot@pugetsound.edu or atubert@pugetsound.edu.

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