UPS Ethics Bowl Team Competes in First Ever Intercollegiate Ethics Bowl at the Washington Corrections Center for Women (WCCW)

The Puget Sound Ethics Bowl team competed in the first ever Intercollegiate Ethics Bowl at the Washington Corrections Center for Women (WCCW) on April 14, 2019. The University of Puget Sound and the the Freedom Education Project Puget Sound (FEPPS) teams debated questions such as: Should we bring back species that have been driven to extinction? Are laws allowing terminally ill children to choose euthanasia morally defensible? Is China’s social credit system, which assigns a social credit score based on behavior, morally justified? Do wealthy nations owe a climate debt obligation toward less-wealthy nations? 

FEPPS describes their mission as being:

A rigorous college program for incarcerated women, trans-identified and gender nonconforming people in Washington and creates pathways to higher education after students are released from prison. Our goals are to increase FEPPS students’ economic and personal empowerment, contribute to family stability and reduce recidivism through college education.

The event was sponsored by Freedom Education Project Puget Sound and the University of Washington, Philosophy Department.

This event was also made possible by Paul Tubig, a Philosophy PhD candidate at University of Washington. In addition to coaching the FEPPS team, Paul established ethics bowl at WCCW and organized the event.

Visit the FEPPS Facebook page to read more about the event.

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Left table: FEPPS ethics bowl team

Middle table: Puget Sound Ethics Bowl team

Right table: Judges and moderator

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Paul Tubig

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Puget Sound Students Competed in 2019 National Bioethics Bowl

On April 5–6, students on the Puget Sound Ethics Bowl and their coach, Prof. Tubert, traveled to Mobile, AL to compete in the National Bioethics Bowl at University of South Alabama.

The National Bioethics Bowl is a college-level collaborative presentation and debate about pressing ethical issues in biomedicine and technology. Months prior to the competition, each team receives a case packet containing 15 cases about bioethical dilemmas. Each team conducts research relevant to the individual cases and defend a position using ethical reasoning and argumentation. The bowl entails several rounds of debate. In each round, two teams are given time to present their position and argument for a given case they prepared. Following each presentation, teams have the opportunity to hear and respond to replies from the opposing team. Finally, the teams engage in a Q&A session with judges who included professionals in healthcare, government, and philosophy.

Some of the cases the Puget Sound team presented on were about unrepresented patients, CRISPR babies, and therapeutic misconception.

Students reflected on the value of participating in this bowl:

Liam Grantham ’20: “Debating our positions against another team made us stronger public speakers and improved our ability to act professionally (even when we strongly believe our opponents’ position is flawed)…I would definitely recommend the ethics bowl club to other people who are genuinely interested in ethics as much as we are. It sometimes takes a lot to come to a consensus on some of the cases we were given, but if you are passionate about ethics (doing the right thing), then it is absolutely worth it.” 

Colleen Hanson ’19: “Bioethics bowl is … a necessary space to discuss pressing ethical dilemmas in medicine and biotechnology. There will always be a need for people to critically reflect and make decisions on these issues. Bioethics bowl integrates students and experts from various disciplines and backgrounds, providing a robust and diverse pool of perspectives. As such, I think bioethics bowl is an essential activity not only in the types of skills it develops in students, but in the purpose it serves for the greater bioethics field.”

Simone Moore ’20: “…this experience not only helped us strengthen our rhetorical skills, but challenged us to interrogate and apply the foundational philosophical information that we have gathered through our time at UPS thus far. I feel fortunate that I was able to participate in an event such as this, and I hope that I will be able to do it again…”

Holden Chen ’20: The event was certainly competitive, but at the same time, it was one that prompted a deliberative process that goes beyond itself. We now have familiarity with these timely ethical issues and have acquired the skills and knowledge to develop strong positions, but it doesn’t just stop there for us. The very fact that we were challenged at the competition shows that there’s always more to engage with and consider. The ethical discussions don’t stop, and we as ethicist of the now and of the future have come away from the experience with more appreciation for the process.”

August Malueg ’20: “Ethics bowl has helped me develop strong public speaking skills and has made me more confident in my ability to relate my thoughts to others… In Mobile I had the opportunity to meet students from various universities that traveled to the competition (such as Depauw and Loyola Chicago), as well as locals, who were overwhelmingly hospitable and welcoming. I think it is important to keep ethics bowl active at the university and to continue offering students the chance to travel to compete because it not only helps them in the professional and social sense, but also because they have the opportunity to continue to have novel experiences abroad.” 

UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_19aTop: Holden Chen ’20, Simone Moore ’20, Professor Ariela Tubert, August Malueg ’20, Liam Grantham ’20 / Bottom: Colleen Hanson ’19

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CFP: Upcoming Undergraduate Philosophy Conferences and Philosophy Journals

Several upcoming undergraduate philosophy conferences and undergraduate philosophy journals have put out calls for papers. You are highly encouraged to submit any of your outstanding philosophical work. For more information about submitting your work, visit their websites.

Students whose work is accepted to present at a conference can apply for a travel grant from the university. More details about student travel awards are on the university website.

Moral and Political Philosophy at the Border Conference
Conference Dates: April 26–27, 2019
Submission Deadline:
December 15, 2018
Keynote speaker: 
Dr. Christine Straehle (University of Ottawa) & Sukaina Hirji (Virginia Tech)

24th Annual SUNY Oneonta Undergraduate Philosophy Conference
Conference Dates: April 12–13, 2019
Submission Deadline: December 15, 2018

Great Lakes Philosophy Conference
Conference Dates: April 5–7, 2019
Submission Deadline: December 15, 2018
Keynote Speaker: Robert Audi, University of Notre Dame

Fifth Annual Southern Utah University Undergraduate Philosophy Conference
Conference Dates: March 23, 2019
Submission Deadline:
January 12, 2019

Dianoia: The Undergraduate Philosophy Journal of Boston College
Submission Deadline: January 25, 2019

SLU Undergraduate Philosophy Conference
Conference Dates: March 29–30, 2019
Submission Deadline:
January 31, 2019
Keynote Speaker: David Wong, Duke University

Gonzaga University Undergraduate Conference
Conference Dates: April 12–13, 2019
Submission Deadline: February 15, 2019

Rowan University Regional Undergraduate Ethics Conference
Conference Dates: April 12, 2019
Submission Deadline:
February 22, 2019

Applications Open for PIKSI – Deadline January 31

PIKSI summer institutes are designed to encourage undergraduates from groups traditionally underrepresented in philosophy to consider future study of philosophy.  Undergraduates and recent graduates are urged to apply; groups traditionally underrepresented in (anglophone) philosophy include women, LGBTQ and gender non-conforming people, people from economically disadvantaged communities, people with disabilities, and people of color or people racialized as nonwhite, including Chicano/a/xs and Latino/a/xs, Indigenous people, Pacific Islanders, people of African descent, and people of Asian descent. Transportation and lodging are provided. Stipends are awarded to all.

APPLICATION DEADLINES

Undergraduates – January 31, 2019

Graduate Assistants (PIKSI-Rock only) – January 31, 2019

PIKSI ROCK
Rock Ethics Institute/Penn State

Dates: June 17-28, 2019
Director: Kris Sealey, Fairfield University
Theme: Philosophy and Public Life
Speakers: Myisha Cherry, University of California, Riverside, Axelle Karera, Wesleyan University, Esme Murdock, San Diego State University, Yannik Thiem, Villanova University

PIKSI BOSTON
MIT/UMB

Dates: June 20-27, 2019*
Faculty Directors: Lisa Rivera, University of Massachusetts Boston & Keota Fields, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth
Graduate Directors: Mallory Weber, MIT & Marion Boulicault, MIT
Speakers: TBA

*to be confirmed 

For more information visit: piksi.org

Contact: info@piksi.org

SPONSORS: THE ANDREW W. MELLON FOUNDATION, AMERICAN PHILOSOPHICAL ASSOCIATION – PENN STATE’S ROCK ETHICS INSTITUTE, COLLEGE OF THE LIBERAL ARTS, AND DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY – MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY – STONY BROOK UNIVERSITY – UNIVERSITY OF OREGON – UNIVERSITY OF IOWA – IRIS MARION YOUNG DIVERSITY SCHOLARS FUND – ANN ARBOR PHILOSOPHERS’ PIKSI FUNDING INITIATIVE – ASSOCIATION OF FEMINIST ETHICS AND SOCIAL THEORY – PRINCETON UNIVERSITY PRESS-HARVARD UNIVERSITY-TUFTS UNIVERSITY