sarah-jacobson-2

Alumni Profiles: Sarah Jacobson

Philosophy majors pursue a wide variety of career paths after graduation, including but not limited to law, business, and higher education. Every few weeks, we will be featuring one of our department’s alumni, highlighting how their studies in philosophy have helped them in their post-graduate careers.

Sarah Jacobson graduated in 2005 with a degree in Philosophy. She now works as a Transit Control Supervisor for the Minneapolis Metro Transit. When asked how studying philosophy has helped her in her career, she said:

“My philosophy degree helped me transition into management positions easily, since I have superior critical thinking and problem solving skills and excellent written and oral communication. My career didn’t turn out as planned, but even so, I think my degree set me up to succeed.”

medium_hsimcoe

Alumni Profiles: Holli Fillbach Simcoe ’95

Philosophy majors pursue a wide variety of career paths after graduation, including but not limited to law, business, and higher education. Every few weeks, we will be featuring one of our department’s alumni, highlighting how their studies in philosophy have helped them in their post-graduate careers.

Holli Fillbach Simcoe graduated in 1995 with a degree in Philosophy. She now works as an Assistant General Counsel at Huron Consulting Group, which is a global management consulting group. When asked how studying philosophy has helped her in her career, she said:

“It’s hard to put a finger on exactly how philosophy studies have contributed to my career. It certainly helps me to be a critical thinker but also to be open-minded and creative.  I usually have more than one solution to a problem which most people find refreshing(…) in our many class discussions, I often took the minority viewpoint for the sake of argument. For example, if you were stuck on a boat in the ocean would you fend for yourself or cooperate for the greater good.  I found it more interesting to consider fending for myself than the more “sane” concept of working together.  This “thinking skill” or perhaps, “objectivity,” allows me to consider many angles of an issue or problem.  I tend not to dismiss something that may seem less rational than other solutions.”

 

rogervaldez

Alumni Profiles: Roger Valdez ’90

Philosophy majors pursue a wide variety of career paths after graduation, including but not limited to law, business, and higher education. Every few weeks, we will be featuring one of our department’s alumni, highlighting how their studies in philosophy have helped them in their post-graduate careers.

Roger Valdez graduated from Puget Sound in 1990 with a major in philosophy. He is now the director of Smart Growth Seattle, an advocacy group that works with the City of Seattle to manage neighborhood growth. He has been profiled in The Stranger, Seattle Met Magazine, and Seattle Times, and also contributes to Forbes Magazine. We asked him how studying philosophy has helped him in his career, and he had this to say:

“Throughout my career in public policy, I have relied on my study of philosophy in four important ways. First, I learned how to argue in philosophy – and I don’t mean just shouting louder than someone on the other side. Philosophy trains the mind to organize ideas and find flaws, inconsistencies, and errors in the other sides arguments. Second, I started to learn how to write in my philosophy classes. Many of the things I learned in my years in the program formed the foundation for the writing I do today. Third, the history of ideas matters; who’d have thought that I’d be quoting from Marx’s Critique of the Gotha Program (“History repeats itself, first as tragedy, then as farce”) on the local radio station more than 25 years after the collapse of the Soviet Union (…) Finally, my philosophy education, and more broadly my liberal arts education, has given me a rich context in ideas and culture from which to draw when both understanding where our current world came from and where it might be going.”

 

Philosophy degree pays off

A philosophy degree pays off in many ways but it also pays off in terms of earnings.  There have been many articles pointing this out but check out this recent one.  Here is a brief excerpt:

 A philosophy degree earns more than an accounting degree

We talk a lot about the need for good jobs in America, but good-paying jobs often require certain skills. Engineering, science and technical degrees are seen as highly prized, and not without merit. However, you don’t necessary need to major in software development or computer science to go far in this world. You can make a good living with a philosophy degree…

AND HERE’S THE ZINGER …

No. 1—PHILOSOPHY

I think, therefore I … make money! Graduates with philosophy degrees have “higher earnings potential than many other arts and humanities-related fields,” said TheRichest. Payscale reports midcareer median salaries are $84,000 for your modern day Kant or Descartes. Why? Well, let’s be logical. Which is exactly what philosophy programs require of students … logic. Thinking is hard, it requires analysis, and those who can do it well can get a good job … which is a good philosophy to have.

Career Services Philosophy Open House

CES Philosophy Open House

Wednesday, February 25 @ 4pm

Howarth 101

 The office of Career and Employment Services is having a special session for philosophy majors, minors, or students considering a philosophy major or minor.

 Come learn about what philosophy students have done after graduation, how to present the skills you acquire in your classes to employers, how to prepare a resume, where to search for internships and summer jobs, how to prepare for the career fair, and much more.

 If you have any questions, please contact:

Jennifer Allen-Ayres,
Career Advisor, Office of Career and Employment Services

Prof. Ariela Tubert,
Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Philosophy

Writing Advisor Positions

The deadline for applying to be a writing advisor at the Center for Writing, Learning, and Teaching is 2/14/14.  It’s a great job that can help you improve your own writing while also helping other students with their writing.  You can find the information on how to apply here.

Writing Advisor Positions for 2010-2011

The Writing Center is taking applications for peer writing advisors for next academic year.  The application deadline is March 10, 2010.

The Peer Writing Advisor positions are open to students with at least a 3.3 G.P.A. who will be enrolled at the University of Puget Sound during the 2010-11 school year. Preference will be given to students who will be juniors and seniors during the next academic year.

For more information: http://www.pugetsound.edu/academics/academic-resources/cwlt/writing/becoming-a-writing-advisor/